Fun Things To Do In Istanbul
7. Visit the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia & Basilica Cistern – Inside the Hagia Sophia Underground in the Basilica Cistern Inside the Blue Moque Being that the city of Istanbul spans two continents, it’s not surprising that it holds an incredible amount of historical significance. There are 3 buildings that should be on every history-lover’s Turkey bucket list and each has its own allure. How to do it yourself: All located in the Sultanahmet neighborhood, you can visit these attractions in the same morning. The Blue Mosque is free to enter, but you must cover shoulders and legs and wear a head covering. (There are coverings available to borrow free of charge.) Hagia Sophia underwent a change in 2020 and is no longer a museum but a working mosque once again.

This means it’s free to enter (whereas the museum had an entrance fee) but you are limited in which areas you are allowed to explore. You will also need to follow the same dress code as with the Blue Mosque. Tickets to the Basilica Cistern can be purchased at the entrance for 30 TL (~$3 USD) each. *2021 Note: As of summer 2021, the Basilica Cistern is closed to the public for renovations until further notice.

The Blue Mosque is also undergoing renovations and is only partially open for visitors. This meant that the lines to enter were extremely long.

Which thing is famous in Istanbul?

The Blue Mosque is an iconic historical landmark in Istanbul and one you shouldn’t miss. Once inside, you’ll discover where the mosque gotten its name – from the thousands of blue handcrafted İznik tiles that adorn the interior walls. The tiles depict traditional Ottoman patterns, flowers, fruit, and more.

Is 3 days enough in Istanbul?

How Long Should You Stay in Istanbul? – First, ask yourself the following questions: Did you come to Turkey primarily to tour Istanbul ? Or do you want to visit other Turkish destinations as well? Istanbul is a fantastic tourist destination in and of itself.

However, if you prefer to visit other places, such as Cappadocia or Pakkumale, don’t be overwhelmed by all the sights to see in Istanbul! If you just want to see the attractions of Istanbul, a day or two should enough! If you like having a full itinerary, three days in Istanbul is more than plenty.

However, if you are a more leisurely visitor, allow yourself extra time to enjoy all that the complicated city has to offer. Finally, obviously, your budget must correspond to your itinerary. Istanbul is not a particularly costly place to visit. In fact, you may want to stay longer to save money on your trip!

Can you wear jeans in Istanbul?

Istanbul Dress Code For Tourists – The general Istanbul dress code for tourists and especially women is to cover your legs at least past to your knees, cover your chest and cover any cleavage and cover your stomach, Based on my experience visiting and living in Istanbul, having the bottom of your legs showing and feet is fine.

  • Having your lower forearm showing and even all of your arm and shoulders showing in the summer is also fine, as it is very hot.
  • Talking of the heat again, Summer in Istanbul is very very hot and dressing more modesty like this is hard, below I’ll give you some ideas of what to pack for summer in Istanbul.

However, in the cooler months like March, April, May, October, and November, and the very cold months like December, January, and February, how to dress in Istanbul as a tourist and how to dress in Istanbul as a woman is very easy because you’ll naturally want to wear more covering clothes to stay warm.

Is it OK to wear shorts in Turkey?

In the City – In Turkish cities, shorts and T-shirts are acceptable. There is no problem wearing shorts for comfort, except when you visit mosques, As for Turks, most of them will be wearing “smart casual” clothes: sleeved summer dresses or sleeved top and skirt for women, short-sleeved shirt and long trousers for men.

What is famous to buy in Turkey?

What is best to buy in Turkey? – Some of the famous things to buy in Turkey are Turkish delight, handmade rugs, Turkish mosaic lamps, blue evil eye amulets, ceramics, tea sets, antiques, Turkish spices, olive oil soap, silver jewelry, and dry fruits.

Is Istanbul very cheap?

1. Is Istanbul Expensive? – When compared to many major cities in the world and in Europe prices, Istanbul isn’t too expensive, It is expensive relative to the other destinations in EU such as Poland, Romania or Bulgaria. Istanbul was ranked 173rd over 206 cities in the world in the 2021 Mercer Cost of Living Survey (was 156th in 2020).

How much money is enough for Istanbul?

High-end traveller: 5000 TRY / person / day – A generous budget of 276 USD per person per day (or 1932 USD/week) is more than enough for Istanbul. A boutique hotel costs around 2500 TRY/night (twin share), which leaves you with spending money of 2500 TRY/day: Use it for taxis, a fancy Turkish breakfast and other meals at higher-end or international restaurants, a private guided tour and fun experience such as a cooking class, a luxury hammam treatment, and a sunset cruise on the Bosphorus.

What is the best month to go to Istanbul?

By Lale Surmen Aran and Tankut Aran – Istanbul has a moderate climate year-round. It is generally hot and humid from mid-July to mid-August, and it can snow during January and February. The peak-season months (with the best weather) are from mid-April to June and September to October.

During the off-season, you can generally find better deals and smaller crowds, the weather is usually good, and all the sights are open. Weather conditions can change throughout the day — especially in spring and fall — but extremes are rare. Summer temperatures generally range from 65ºF to 85ºF (42 º –60 º in winter).

Temperatures below freezing and above 90 º make headlines. Keep in mind that prices in Istanbul are higher during festivals and holidays such as Easter, Christmas, and New Year’s. On holidays, you’ll see lots of vacationing Europeans, mostly from Spain, Italy, and France.

Is 2 days in Istanbul enough?

Finding the Universe contains affiliate links, meaning if you make a purchase through these links, we may earn a commission at no extra cost to you. If you’re planning a trip to Turkey, then we highly recommend spending some time in Istanbul. This is the largest city in the country, and is generally regarded as the most important city in terms of cultural and historical interest.

Istanbul is home to numerous wonderful sights, and we’ve always enjoyed our visits here. How long you visit will of course depend on your schedule, but we think 2 days in Istanbul will give you enough time to see the main highlights. You could do this either as a weekend in Istanbul, or as the start of a longer trip, such as that outlined in our 2-week Turkey itinerary,

In this guide, we’re going to share with you a detailed itinerary for spending two days in Istanbul. We’ll tell you all the things you should see, share a map to help you visualise your trip, give you tips on where to stay, and share some practical advice for your visit.

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Is 4 days in Istanbul enough?

Is 4 Days enough to visit Istanbul? – In short – yes it is. Of course, as with any major city around the world, 4 days is never quite enough to explore everything you would want to see in Istanbul. Having said that however, 4 days is the perfect amount of time to get a good impression of the city and see the majority of the main tourist attractions in Turkey’s biggest city.

  1. Particularly in the Sultanahmet district, the main cultural centres are condensed into a small area which means you can explore many different tourist attractions in a short amount of time.
  2. With a 4-day Istanbul itinerary, you do have to make some small sacrifices.
  3. It would be impossible to explore all the different districts of the city so you have to prioritise what you want to see.

An area of the city that we were unable to visit on our own 4-day trip of Istanbul for example was Barat – the old Jewish Quarter that has transformed into a multi-cultural hipster neighbourhood in recent years. Fun Things To Do In Istanbul Hagia Sophia – one of the highlights of your 4-day Istanbul Itinerary

Can you hold hands in Istanbul?

Can couples hold hands in Istanbul? – Yes, of course, couples can hold hands, hug, and have fun in Istanbul.

Can you flush toilet paper in Istanbul?

We all use the toilet (tuvalet) several times daily, and for your trip to Turkey it’s important to know about them: Toilets are marked with ” WC,” Tuvalet, or ” 00 ” and the words Bay (Mr, male) or Bayan (Ms, female), or with pictograms, or with gender-marker items such as a tobacco pipe for men and a fan for women.

( Turkish Language Guide ) Most of the toilets you’ll encounter in Turkey are of the standard Western raised-commode type, and the newer models (like the one in the photo to the right) have two-flush mechanism s which make a small flush for liquids and a large flush for solids in order to conserve water.

The sign above the flusher panel in the top photo to the right says “Please help us save water! Push flush button twice,” which is counter-intuitive to say the least. What it means is that the first push starts the flush, and the second push stops it, saving water.

You may also see the older, flat ” elephant’s feet ” type of toilet on which you squat rather than sit. To squat on a flat toilet may seem scary to someone used to the raised commode, but it’s actually quite hygienic once you get used to it (if ever), because only your feet touch the toilet. It also puts you in what doctors might call an ” anatomically correct position ” for the swift and efficient completion of the business at hand.

Just don’t let all the stuff fall out of your pockets into the flat toilet while you’re squatting! 😉 Although you’ll see more of these flat alaturka toilets in public toilets and in the less developed regions of the country, both styles of toilet are used by the local population, so even new buildings will have flat toilets installed along with the commodes.

If you see only flat ones, look around for a stall with a raised commode. There’s probably one close by. Both types of toilet have a spigot and/or a container of water for washing the left hand after use, because the bare left hand, not toilet paper, is traditionally used to splash water on the bum to cleanse it.

In the second photo to the right, note the small pipe and valve to the left of the commode. These provide water to the small white nozzle at the back of the bowl for washing the left hand after it has been used for splashing and wiping. Many toilet stalls may be furnished with toilet paper, but it’s traditionally used not to wipe but to dry your bottom and your hand after the splashing.

  • In April 2015, Turkey’s supreme Islamic religious body, the government Diyanet, issued a fetva that use of toilet paper for cleaning was permitted, but washing with water was still the preferred method.
  • Nothing was said about the reason for using paper: that it shields the hand from fecal matter which may spread disease.) Hands are washed with soap after toilet use—one hopes.

Some older plumbing, built with only water in mind, is not able to deal with wads of soggy toilet paper and will jam and overflow if much toilet paper is flushed into it. A waste bin is placed near the toilet and users are asked to put used toilet paper into the bin instead.

This is fine if the paper is used only for drying, but highly unsanitary if the paper is used for wiping. Those who use paper for wiping may want to dispose of the first paper in the toilet, and any later papers in the bin—a usually-workable compromise. Public toilets usually charge a small fee (about TL 1.00) for use.

A few may differentiate between büyük abdest (bowel movement) and küçük abdest (urination) and charge more for the former than for the latter, but nowadays it’s mostly a flat fee for whatever you might need to do. —by Tom Brosnahan

Can you drink alcohol on street in Istanbul?

Drinking in public areas is ILLEGAL and the fine is 109 TL.

What can you not bring to Turkey?

Turkey Customs Regulations and Import Restrictions Turkey customs regulations prevent you from bringing drugs, weapons, firearms and radioactive substances into Turkey. What food can you take into Turkey and what can’t you take to Turkey? There are some Turkey prohibited items such as fresh or packaged food, fruit, eggs, meat, dairy products.

  • Pack or two of cookies will not cause any problems though.
  • There is no limit on but you will need to declare amounts over 3000 GBP.
  • The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey is responsible for issuing visas to people who want to visit, work, study or live in Turkey.
  • It is responsible for the management of lawful and orderly entry and stay of people in Turkey, including through effective border security.

It provides information and application forms for migration to Turkey, and information about settling in Turkey, Turkish citizenship, and multicultural affairs. The Turkish Gendarmerie (Jandarma) as a branch of Turkish Armed Forces manages the security and integrity of Turkey’s borders.

  • It works closely with other government and international agencies, in particular the Ministry of Customs and Trade, to detect and deter unlawful movement of goods and people across the border.
  • The Ministry of Agriculture manages quarantine controls at Turkish borders to minimise the risk of exotic diseases entering the country.

Turkey customs regulations and import restrictions There is no import tax for 200 cigarettes, 5 cigarillos (up to 3 grams each), 50 cigars, 200 grams of tobacco, 50 grams of chewing tobacco, 200 grams of wate-pipe tobacco, 200 grams of snuff tobacco.

The Turkey alcohol import limit is 1 bottle of 1 liter or two bottle of 750 ml of wine or spirits (for travellers aged 18 and over). According to Turkey import regulations you can bring 5 bottles of perfume (up to 120 ml each) and medication for personal use. If you exceed the free import limit then your alcohol or tobacco products will be taken to airport storage that you can take back upon your departure from Turkey (airport of arrival and departure should be the same) during next 3 month and storage fee should be paid.

There is no export tax for two kgs or 3 cartoons of local tobacco products, 5 kgs of alcoholic beverages, gift articles up to value of 5,000 TL. Antiquity is also one of completely Turkey prohibited items to export, as for new carpets, a proof of purchase is required.

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What is considered disrespectful in Turkey?

Turkish Culture – Etiquette Nina Evason, 2019

In Turkey, people generally extend an offer multiple times. It is often polite to decline gestures initially and accept once the person has insisted. This exchange allows the offering person to show their sincerity in the gesture, and shows the receiver’s humbleness. Be sure to offer everything multiple times in return. If you only offer something once, a Turk may respond, “No, it’s okay”, out of modesty and even though they meant to accept on the second offer. You may have to be quite insistent if you truly want to refuse an offer or gesture. Place one hand on your chest as you say so. If someone has invited you somewhere, you can make the same gesture and point to your watch to indicate you do not have time to stay. It is polite to stand when someone elderly enters the room. If they do not have a seat, it is expected that they will be offered someone else’s. It is customary for Turkish men to escort women to a seat and to the bathroom during a meal. It is considered rude/disrespectful to chew gum whilst talking to someone of a higher status or at a formal occasion. Avoid sitting in any position that allows one’s shoe to face another person. This is considered insulting. Similarly, it is inappropriate to cross your legs when facing someone. It is considered improper for a woman to cross her legs while sitting. Ask permission before taking a woman’s photograph. Try to gesture, touch people or offer items using only the right hand or both hands together. Many Turks observe a separation between the functions of the hands. This custom is tied to Islamic principles that prescribe the left hand should only be used for removal of dirt and for cleaning. It may not necessarily be strictly followed, but it is best not to use the left hand unless the action is inevitable. People rarely split a bill in Turkey. The person who invited the others to join them will commonly pay, whilst men are usually expected to pay for women. You may offer to pay the whole bill; however, if your Turkish counterpart insists multiple times that you should leave it to them, allow them to pay. It can be a kind gesture to offer to take them out in return next time.

Hospitality (misafirperverlik) is a central virtue in Turkey. Turks are known to be highly generous to their guests, as hosting is considered an honour. Some regard an unexpected guest as ‘a guest from God’ (Tanrı Misafiri). Turks regularly offer invitations for others to join them (e.g. at their table) or have something of theirs. These gestures can come across as overly insistent or demanding to foreigners. However, consider that the former the invitation is, the more earnest and polite it is thought to be. People are expected to be punctual to dinners and intimate gatherings. However, it is appropriate to be late to parties. It is considered a nice gesture to bring sweets, flowers or presents for any children when visiting someone at their home. However, Turks are usually less concerned with what you bring and more interested in socialisation and conversation. If you bring alcohol or food to a gathering, you are expected to share it. Wear clean socks. You will often be expected to take off your shoes before entering a person’s home. In some cases, you may be given a pair of slippers to wear instead. Tea or coffee is offered and drunk at all occasions (commonly traditional Turkish tea or apple tea). It is usually served in a small tulip-shaped glass with sugar. Expect to be offered it as soon as you sit down with a Turk. In some households, you may find that you do not interact with adult female family members during your visit. It is common for women to prepare and clean up after a meal while the men socialise with the guest. Be careful what you compliment in a Turkish person’s house as they may feel compelled to offer it to you as a gift.

Turks generally prefer to eat at sit-down meals. It’s rare for them to snack throughout the day or eat on-the-go. It is also unusual to have ‘pot-luck’ meals whereby every person invited to dinner brings their own dish to share. Typically, the host will cook and prepare everything. In the cities, people generally eat at the table. However, in smaller households, a food stand may be placed on the carpet that everyone then sits around on cushions. Some Turkish households may use a low table with cushions set around it. Turks tend to offer food several times and prompt their guests to have more servings than they can feasibly eat. Try to accept as many things offered as possible, even if you can’t finish all of it. It is best to arrive to a meal on an empty stomach so you can accept multiple servings. If you cannot eat the food, you may have to be quite insistent and give a legitimate reason (e.g. I’m vegetarian). Your host may take initial refusals as and serve more anyway. Some Turks may not eat anything containing alcohol or pork, in accordance with Islamic custom. Much Turkish food involves eating from a selection of small dishes, known as meze, Turks tend to eat at quite a slow, relaxed pace. It is common to stop between courses to smoke a cigarette and have a few drinks before moving on to the next dish. Handle all food with your right hand. The left is associated with cleaning and should not be used to pass, offer or serve food. Do not blow your nose or pick your teeth during a meal. Always keep your feet hidden under the table. Evening meals may be accompanied with alcohol depending on the person you are dining with. The local Turkish drink is called ‘Raký’. Tea or Turkish coffee may be served at the conclusion of a meal. Hosts generally refill any empty glass they see. A good way to compliment a host is to say “Elinize sağılık” (Health to your hands).

Formal gift giving is appreciated, although not necessarily common or expected. Gift wrapping and cards are not common. Turks tend to give gifts on a more casual basis, offering small items and gestures very frequently throughout a friendship. Offer and receive gifts with two hands. Gifts are generally not opened in front of the giver. It is best not to give gifts that contain traces of alcohol or pork. Some Turkish people may drink alcohol. However, since it is a predominantly Muslim country, you should be assured of this fact before giving wine or liquor.

The Cultural Atlas team acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands throughout Australia on whose country we have the privilege to live and work. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander custodians past, present and emerging. : Turkish Culture – Etiquette

How many days is sufficient for Istanbul?

Final Verdict – As you can see, deciding how many days in Istanbul largely depends on you and how action-packed you like your vacations. If you don’t mind rushing around, then you can see everything in 2-3 days. For those who prefer to travel more leisurely, then 4 days is the perfect amount of time to spend in Istanbul,

What is considered rude in Istanbul?

Turkish Culture – Etiquette Nina Evason, 2019

In Turkey, people generally extend an offer multiple times. It is often polite to decline gestures initially and accept once the person has insisted. This exchange allows the offering person to show their sincerity in the gesture, and shows the receiver’s humbleness. Be sure to offer everything multiple times in return. If you only offer something once, a Turk may respond, “No, it’s okay”, out of modesty and even though they meant to accept on the second offer. You may have to be quite insistent if you truly want to refuse an offer or gesture. Place one hand on your chest as you say so. If someone has invited you somewhere, you can make the same gesture and point to your watch to indicate you do not have time to stay. It is polite to stand when someone elderly enters the room. If they do not have a seat, it is expected that they will be offered someone else’s. It is customary for Turkish men to escort women to a seat and to the bathroom during a meal. It is considered rude/disrespectful to chew gum whilst talking to someone of a higher status or at a formal occasion. Avoid sitting in any position that allows one’s shoe to face another person. This is considered insulting. Similarly, it is inappropriate to cross your legs when facing someone. It is considered improper for a woman to cross her legs while sitting. Ask permission before taking a woman’s photograph. Try to gesture, touch people or offer items using only the right hand or both hands together. Many Turks observe a separation between the functions of the hands. This custom is tied to Islamic principles that prescribe the left hand should only be used for removal of dirt and for cleaning. It may not necessarily be strictly followed, but it is best not to use the left hand unless the action is inevitable. People rarely split a bill in Turkey. The person who invited the others to join them will commonly pay, whilst men are usually expected to pay for women. You may offer to pay the whole bill; however, if your Turkish counterpart insists multiple times that you should leave it to them, allow them to pay. It can be a kind gesture to offer to take them out in return next time.

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Hospitality (misafirperverlik) is a central virtue in Turkey. Turks are known to be highly generous to their guests, as hosting is considered an honour. Some regard an unexpected guest as ‘a guest from God’ (Tanrı Misafiri). Turks regularly offer invitations for others to join them (e.g. at their table) or have something of theirs. These gestures can come across as overly insistent or demanding to foreigners. However, consider that the former the invitation is, the more earnest and polite it is thought to be. People are expected to be punctual to dinners and intimate gatherings. However, it is appropriate to be late to parties. It is considered a nice gesture to bring sweets, flowers or presents for any children when visiting someone at their home. However, Turks are usually less concerned with what you bring and more interested in socialisation and conversation. If you bring alcohol or food to a gathering, you are expected to share it. Wear clean socks. You will often be expected to take off your shoes before entering a person’s home. In some cases, you may be given a pair of slippers to wear instead. Tea or coffee is offered and drunk at all occasions (commonly traditional Turkish tea or apple tea). It is usually served in a small tulip-shaped glass with sugar. Expect to be offered it as soon as you sit down with a Turk. In some households, you may find that you do not interact with adult female family members during your visit. It is common for women to prepare and clean up after a meal while the men socialise with the guest. Be careful what you compliment in a Turkish person’s house as they may feel compelled to offer it to you as a gift.

Turks generally prefer to eat at sit-down meals. It’s rare for them to snack throughout the day or eat on-the-go. It is also unusual to have ‘pot-luck’ meals whereby every person invited to dinner brings their own dish to share. Typically, the host will cook and prepare everything. In the cities, people generally eat at the table. However, in smaller households, a food stand may be placed on the carpet that everyone then sits around on cushions. Some Turkish households may use a low table with cushions set around it. Turks tend to offer food several times and prompt their guests to have more servings than they can feasibly eat. Try to accept as many things offered as possible, even if you can’t finish all of it. It is best to arrive to a meal on an empty stomach so you can accept multiple servings. If you cannot eat the food, you may have to be quite insistent and give a legitimate reason (e.g. I’m vegetarian). Your host may take initial refusals as and serve more anyway. Some Turks may not eat anything containing alcohol or pork, in accordance with Islamic custom. Much Turkish food involves eating from a selection of small dishes, known as meze, Turks tend to eat at quite a slow, relaxed pace. It is common to stop between courses to smoke a cigarette and have a few drinks before moving on to the next dish. Handle all food with your right hand. The left is associated with cleaning and should not be used to pass, offer or serve food. Do not blow your nose or pick your teeth during a meal. Always keep your feet hidden under the table. Evening meals may be accompanied with alcohol depending on the person you are dining with. The local Turkish drink is called ‘Raký’. Tea or Turkish coffee may be served at the conclusion of a meal. Hosts generally refill any empty glass they see. A good way to compliment a host is to say “Elinize sağılık” (Health to your hands).

Formal gift giving is appreciated, although not necessarily common or expected. Gift wrapping and cards are not common. Turks tend to give gifts on a more casual basis, offering small items and gestures very frequently throughout a friendship. Offer and receive gifts with two hands. Gifts are generally not opened in front of the giver. It is best not to give gifts that contain traces of alcohol or pork. Some Turkish people may drink alcohol. However, since it is a predominantly Muslim country, you should be assured of this fact before giving wine or liquor.

The Cultural Atlas team acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands throughout Australia on whose country we have the privilege to live and work. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander custodians past, present and emerging. : Turkish Culture – Etiquette

Is 4 days in Istanbul enough?

Is 4 Days enough to visit Istanbul? – In short – yes it is. Of course, as with any major city around the world, 4 days is never quite enough to explore everything you would want to see in Istanbul. Having said that however, 4 days is the perfect amount of time to get a good impression of the city and see the majority of the main tourist attractions in Turkey’s biggest city.

Particularly in the Sultanahmet district, the main cultural centres are condensed into a small area which means you can explore many different tourist attractions in a short amount of time. With a 4-day Istanbul itinerary, you do have to make some small sacrifices. It would be impossible to explore all the different districts of the city so you have to prioritise what you want to see.

An area of the city that we were unable to visit on our own 4-day trip of Istanbul for example was Barat – the old Jewish Quarter that has transformed into a multi-cultural hipster neighbourhood in recent years. Fun Things To Do In Istanbul Hagia Sophia – one of the highlights of your 4-day Istanbul Itinerary